Single review: Barry Can’t Swim – Some Day I Will

Originally from Edinburgh and now living in London, Barry Can’t Swim is a jazz-trained multi-instrumentalist. This background has undoubtedly aided and influenced his approach to music production; his housey stylings are akin to contemporaries such as Laurence Guy, Dan Shake and Folamour (actually, this would be a dream lineup).

Barry Can’t Swim has self-released three tracks previously and they’re of a quality you would expect from a veteran producer; his earlier release ‘Because I Wanted You to Know’ is a personal deep house favourite of mine.

His latest is on new London imprint Part Four Records, who continue their Scottish love affair having just released ‘We Can’t Be Dreaming’ by Edinburgh duo LF System. Barry Can’t Swim has also been lauded by none other than Elton John, on his Apple Music show Rocket Hour – yes, the Rocketman is a fan. Why wouldn’t he be? He’s also had plays on BBC Radio 1 from both Pete Tong and new dance music champion Jaguar. For a relatively new artist, these are some impressive accolades in the ever-crowded arena of dance music.

‘Some Day I Will’ is also a debut for Ethiopian singer Hawi, who sings in her native tongue about her homeland of Oromia. Artists such as Black Coffee and Black Motion have shone a spotlight on African house music, and these rhythms and influences can be heard in this uplifting piece of music: plush syncopated bass, dusky beats and a harp that’s played rhythmically like Zimbabwean marimba music. 70s-sounding keys with warm and bold tones then permeate, in a brief moment of calm before the infectious rhythm returns. Combine with Hawi’s positive tone and enchanting words, and you’re instantly transported to a sunnier place. And if you wanna dance around your living room – go for it.

‘Some Day I Will’ is out now on Part Four Records


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