Recipe: Traditional Scottish Tattie Scones

Tattie scones are a traditional Scottish staple. They’re easy to make and they’re also great for using up excess potatoes, especially if they are past their best – as long as they aren’t green. So don’t throw them out. Instead, add this handy recipe to your repertoire.

We are big fans of tattie scones. They have just the right balance of carbs – well…they are fully carbed! Have them fried with your full Sunday breakfast or grill them and slather them in butter for a more ‘dainty’ snack.

If you don’t plan on frying the scones right away, then you can refrigerate them for a few days at least. We’re unsure how long they can be stored in the fridge, as they’ve never stayed in the container long enough! They can be frozen, but will stick together very easily, so it’s best to use wax sheets to separate them.


Tattie Scones

Ingredients

450g cooked and peeled potatoes

110g self-raising flour

55g butter

Salt and pepper

Method

If you don’t have leftover cooked potatoes handy, you need to cut your raw potatoes into quarters and place them into cold, salted water.

Cover with lid and simmer until tender (about 20 minutes).

Drain, then mash your potatoes with the flour, butter and your preferred amount of seasoning.

Mix until a stiff dough forms.

Turn dough out onto a lightly floured work surface.

Knead the dough lightly and roll out to about 1/2-inch thick.

Use a scone cutter or a mug to cut out shapes, or work freehand if you are artistically inclined. There are no limits to the shape a tattie scone can be. The sky is the limit.

Heat a lightly greased griddle or frying pan over a medium-high heat.

Working in batches, depending on how many can fit comfortably in your pan, cook your scones.

This should take around 4-5 mins for each side, or until they are golden brown.

How do you like your tattie scones? Alongside a full breakfast? In a roll? (soft or crispy?) or on sliced white bread? Then we can start on the whole ketchup or brown sauce discussion. Who knew that a humble potato based breakfast item could be so versatile?

More tattie scones

Read the January 2021 issue of SNACK magazine on your tablet, mobile, or pc.

  • Writes about food and travel at Foodie Explorers website. Can be mostly found cuddling cats, watching crime documentaries and drinking a beer.

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